Until recently my mom lived 3700+ miles away from us. Despite this she was determined to be a part of her grandchildren’s lives. So we had a weekly Skype date with her. Earlier this year we were lucky enough to have her move much closer to us! However, despite her being only a 10 minute drive away, due to the current pandemic we have decided to keep our distance seeing as she is among the 60+ crowd and therefore considered high risk.
Over the past three years, since we moved to Alaska my mom had developed some awesome ways to stay connected with her grandchildren from afar. I figured, with the current necessity of social distancing, some grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends, etc might want some suggestions on how to Skype more successfully with young children.

Jasper is been super into finding “treasure” recently. He and his friends found a Christmas ornament hanging from a tree on a recent hike. The oldest friend decided that Jasper got to keep this AMAZING find. Jasper was so proud. He also recently found a (extremely old and falling apart) piece of rope tied to a tree. He was convinced it was something super special and told me all about how no one but him was allowed to touch it. I’m not even going into the stories of all the SUPER SPECIAL rocks we have taken home with us.
I decided I would make him a little treasure hunt of sorts in honor of St. Patrick’s day. If you have some gold (or yellow) paint, rocks and chipping tools then I’m sure you can make something similar!

Did you know there are two different starts to the Iditarod, the ceremonial start and the restart. Though we had hoped to attend the restart this year, we have only ever attended the ceremonial start.
The ceremonial starts begins in Anchorage and has done so since 1983. Starting at 10am on the first Saturday in March, racers leave the start line and go on an 11 mile run to Campbell Airstrip. This run does not count for their official race time. The restart begins at 2pm the following day in a town called Willow, about 70 miles north of Anchorage.

The year 2020 has presented us with many days of negative temperatures. This has given us the great opportunity to experiment with projects that require cold weather! Recently we made frozen bubbles!

There are 616 named glaciers in Alaska. Though there is estimated to be around 100,000 glaciers within the state. I have seen more glaciers than I can count since moving to here. We have hiked to both Byron Glacier and Exit Glacier. However, until last Saturday I had never actually touched a glacier!

I have been trying to find incentive to get us out in these frigid temperatures and Pinterest has provided! The last few days we have been experimenting with making colorful icicles! Let me tell you, they are beautiful!

Yesterday we built our second rainbow snow volcano in just over a week! This may be Jasper’s new favorite thing to do! To create this project all you need is some simple household items (until your child uses all of the vinegar and baking soda and you have to run to the store to replenish it)!

Before we moved to Alaska, we had never celebrated the solstices before. I only knew when the winter solstice was because it is the same day as my brother and sister’s. However, in Alaska the summer and winter solstice is a big deal. There are multiple celebrations. We particularly enjoy the Solstice Tree Tour in Kincaid Park and the Ice Lantern Walk at the Eagle River Nature Center. This year we hope to attend Anchorage’s solstice festival for the first time.

This time next Fall we will be a few months into our true home school journey.  For the time being we are trying to find what works for us and when good times for lessons are. I love to incorporate learning into the time we already spend outside. The last few weeks we explored a “Fall” theme. At this age, exploring the world around us is a great way for Jasper to learn! In addition Jasper is very interested in writing, so I have found ways to incorporate writing into our learning.